The 6 Ultimate Steps to Success with Robert Riopel

Robert Riopel discusses the 6 life-changing habits to achieving your dreams while keeping it real, relevant, and repeatable. He also talks about the 4 phases of life and the 4 currencies.

Transcript
Sarah St John:

Be sure to grab your free copy of my list of 27 tools,

Sarah St John:

resources, and software programs.

Sarah St John:

I use to run my businesses on a tight budget.

Sarah St John:

You can get it at the Sarah St.

Sarah St John:

john.com forward slash 27 tools.

Sarah St John:

That's T H E S a R a H S T J O H n.com forward slash 27.

Sarah St John:

welcome to the frugal preneur podcast.

Sarah St John:

I'm your host, Sarah St.

Sarah St John:

John and my guests today learn during his extensive travels teaching

Sarah St John:

around the world that he noticed success has left clues everywhere.

Sarah St John:

These are insights that people like himself have come to learn through

Sarah St John:

experience and trial and error that they now pass on to those who

Sarah St John:

follow allowing others to bypass obstacles and obtain results sooner.

Sarah St John:

Welcome to the show.

Sarah St John:

Robert reopened.

Robert Riopel:

Hey, Sarah, great to be here and feeling blessed to be

Robert Riopel:

able to help an audience, especially of entrepreneurs in any way I can.

Sarah St John:

Well, awesome.

Sarah St John:

Well, can you give us a little bit of your background history and

Sarah St John:

I'm curious to hear more about.

Sarah St John:

These travels and about what you mean by success left clues

Sarah St John:

everywhere, because you have a book also called success, left a clue.

Sarah St John:

So I'm, I'm curious to hear more about what, that means.

Robert Riopel:

Exactly.

Robert Riopel:

first of all, I became an entrepreneur almost by stumbling into it.

Robert Riopel:

It wasn't supposed to be because where I grew up, I was taught here's the.

Robert Riopel:

I don't even think about the box and don't question the box and just, you don't

Robert Riopel:

do the way things are supposed to be.

Robert Riopel:

And, growing up, one of the things that I'm working, it was when it comes to

Robert Riopel:

work, you find a job that's secure.

Robert Riopel:

If there's such a thing, and if it's paying you a wage, even if you don't like

Robert Riopel:

it, you do it to support your family.

Robert Riopel:

And by the age of 21, all of a sudden I'm being laid off from the third job

Robert Riopel:

because they're shutting the factory down and I'm going, I'm working on.

Robert Riopel:

I'm staying loyal, but something's not working here.

Robert Riopel:

And here in Alberta at the time we were in the middle of an oil bust, something

Robert Riopel:

that you understand in Texas more than other people do because when oil prices

Robert Riopel:

are down, the economy doesn't do well.

Robert Riopel:

And I couldn't find it another real job by my definition.

Robert Riopel:

So to support my family, I decided to do something until I found another job.

Robert Riopel:

And I started delivering.

Robert Riopel:

And I started delivering for Domino's pizza.

Robert Riopel:

I know no one's ever heard of them.

Robert Riopel:

And from, because of my work ethic, I went from being a delivery driver

Robert Riopel:

to actually becoming a manager.

Robert Riopel:

My wife became my assistant.

Robert Riopel:

Next thing you know, we're working open to close seven days

Robert Riopel:

a week and a year and a half in.

Robert Riopel:

We were faced with that dilemma that our franchisee decided he didn't

Robert Riopel:

want to be in Domino's pizza anymore.

Robert Riopel:

And he was selling his two sisters.

Robert Riopel:

And it was like, oh, we're about to be laid off again.

Robert Riopel:

And I kind of went into panic mode and I don't know how much you know

Robert Riopel:

about Domino's pizza, Sarah, but you actually can't just buy a franchise.

Robert Riopel:

You actually have to qualify first by being a manager for at least a year and

Robert Riopel:

successfully meet a bunch of criteria.

Robert Riopel:

And so my wife and I are actually qualified to be franchisees, which

Robert Riopel:

would mean they would waive the upfront franchise fee, but you

Robert Riopel:

still had to have money to buy your.

Robert Riopel:

And then, so I'm thinking my natural way of thinking is we're going to have

Robert Riopel:

to find another franchisee, find out who needs a manager, get a new job.

Robert Riopel:

And my wife's like, why would we do that?

Robert Riopel:

Why don't we just buy this store?

Robert Riopel:

And I'm looking at it.

Robert Riopel:

And I'm like, cause we don't have any money.

Robert Riopel:

That's why we don't do this.

Robert Riopel:

And I'll tell you, I am so blessed to have my wife because we met when we were 30.

Robert Riopel:

We started dating when we were 16, we got married when we were 19 and we just

Robert Riopel:

celebrated our 32nd wedding anniversary.

Robert Riopel:

And please don't do the math of how old I am.

Robert Riopel:

here I am, I'm the, in the box thinker.

Robert Riopel:

But to my wife, it's like, what box are you talking about?

Robert Riopel:

There's no such thing as a box.

Robert Riopel:

She said, let's figure out a way to do it.

Robert Riopel:

And so we started making a lot of mistakes, figuring out how do you

Robert Riopel:

buy a business if you don't have.

Robert Riopel:

But every time we made a mistake, we actually learned something.

Robert Riopel:

And eventually after about four months, we now knew what to say and what not to.

Robert Riopel:

When we were introduced to our own bank manager for business accounts.

Robert Riopel:

And when we were able to finally get a meeting with

Robert Riopel:

him, we were able to sit down.

Robert Riopel:

We knew what to say, what not to say.

Robert Riopel:

And he didn't give us the financing for our store.

Robert Riopel:

He actually gave us a hundred percent financing for both the

Robert Riopel:

sores my franchisee had for sale.

Robert Riopel:

And next thing you know, we're franchisees and it's like, Ooh, we've got it made.

Robert Riopel:

But here's the problem.

Robert Riopel:

We knew how to run a Domino's pizza, but we didn't know how to run a business.

Robert Riopel:

And I think, you know, Sarah, there's a big difference right there.

Robert Riopel:

And in our first couple of years, it was our whole working mindset was if

Robert Riopel:

there's money in that bank, we must be doing okay because we didn't think

Robert Riopel:

we could afford to hire an accountant.

Robert Riopel:

We thought we'd do it on her.

Robert Riopel:

Right.

Robert Riopel:

You talk about being a frugal.

Robert Riopel:

Preneur is like, we can figure it out.

Robert Riopel:

We'll do it on our own.

Robert Riopel:

The fact that we're working 80 hours a week in the store and

Robert Riopel:

we'll do our accounting as well.

Robert Riopel:

Yeah.

Robert Riopel:

That didn't work.

Robert Riopel:

And a couple of years in when the, because of we're now behind

Robert Riopel:

on paperwork and the government's like knocking on the door, hello.

Robert Riopel:

We've had to hire an accountant.

Robert Riopel:

They got everything straightened out and caught up.

Robert Riopel:

And also they're looking at.

Robert Riopel:

How did you guys figure, how did you make it?

Robert Riopel:

There's no way you should have survived and been able to stay in business.

Robert Riopel:

You've lost two years, but at least at that point, ignorance was bliss.

Robert Riopel:

We didn't know what we didn't know.

Robert Riopel:

And we were just too tenacious to quit.

Robert Riopel:

We made it work.

Robert Riopel:

And once we had our numbers in place, we started understanding it.

Robert Riopel:

We started doing better when we started making.

Robert Riopel:

But then we did something that and I, I'm probably going to shock you Sarah,

Robert Riopel:

because we did something that probably no one else you've ever known as ever done.

Robert Riopel:

I hope you're ready because I don't want to shock you to battery.

Robert Riopel:

Ready?

Robert Riopel:

Ready?

Robert Riopel:

We started spending more money than we were earning.

Robert Riopel:

I know, right?

Robert Riopel:

No one's ever done that before.

Robert Riopel:

And, but we were franchisees for eight years.

Robert Riopel:

We're now actually over $150,000 in personal debt.

Robert Riopel:

And going down quickly.

Robert Riopel:

And that's when we were introduced to personal development and we ended up doing

Robert Riopel:

a three-day training that taught us a, why were we spending money the way we were?

Robert Riopel:

Why weren't we managing it, but how to manage it?

Robert Riopel:

More importantly, it taught us to take responsibility.

Robert Riopel:

See, we, I was good at blaming other people while they lost my

Robert Riopel:

investment or because of them.

Robert Riopel:

I lost my.

Robert Riopel:

And the moment we learned to take responsibility ourself,

Robert Riopel:

we are then open to, okay.

Robert Riopel:

How, if we want to get out of debt, how do we do it?

Robert Riopel:

And when we left that training, we decided we had to put things into action and

Robert Riopel:

step number three of my book of success left, a clue is you must take action.

Robert Riopel:

That's what separates success from non-success.

Robert Riopel:

And we put things into action that we'd learned that week.

Robert Riopel:

And next thing, you know, we were able to go from me the $150,000 in

Robert Riopel:

debt to actually retired completely financially free nine months later at

Robert Riopel:

the age of 32 We're like that worked.

Robert Riopel:

If this wedge information gave us out result, what would more learning do?

Robert Riopel:

And we became, super learners.

Robert Riopel:

We want to learn from everybody we could, because I'm also a big believer.

Robert Riopel:

Don't just learn.

Robert Riopel:

Don't just learn from one person.

Robert Riopel:

And while we're on that learning journey, I realized my passion, my

Robert Riopel:

passion was to teach others because I felt that if I could even help

Robert Riopel:

one person do what we'd been able to do it, make it all worthwhile.

Robert Riopel:

And so now the last 18 and a half years, plus I've been blessed

Robert Riopel:

to travel around the world.

Robert Riopel:

And I've personally trained over half a million people around the world in about

Robert Riopel:

30 different countries living my passion.

Robert Riopel:

And while I've been doing that, I've been blessed to share the stage with a lot of

Robert Riopel:

the greatest thought leaders in the room.

Robert Riopel:

And I'm watching successful people.

Robert Riopel:

And I started noticing the differences between success and not, and I

Robert Riopel:

just decided to call them clues.

Robert Riopel:

And that's when I decided to put them together in a book.

Robert Riopel:

And these are clues that if you utilize them, you can have an amazing life.

Robert Riopel:

You can design the life that you want.

Robert Riopel:

And that's kind of where I'm at today.

Sarah St John:

Oh, wow.

Sarah St John:

That's quite the story.

Sarah St John:

So I'm, curious about the different types of clues.

Sarah St John:

Can you maybe go into, without giving the whole book away?

Sarah St John:

Of course.

Sarah St John:

Some things,

Robert Riopel:

the book has six specific steps that a person

Robert Riopel:

can take to design their.

Robert Riopel:

And mixed in there.

Robert Riopel:

I give a lot of clues and that's why on the front I'm known

Robert Riopel:

for on the stage giving clues.

Robert Riopel:

That's why I have my hands up.

Robert Riopel:

It's like, I'll have my audience go give us a clue.

Robert Riopel:

And when they do that, I'll give them a clue.

Robert Riopel:

Like well, here's one.

Robert Riopel:

Have you noticed that when people learn a system, especially entrepreneurs,

Robert Riopel:

they learn a system, but then their mind automatically goes, I have to do.

Robert Riopel:

I have to reinvent this wheel and they wonder why they struggle.

Robert Riopel:

So the one clue is if you're going to reinvent the wheel, do

Robert Riopel:

it later, do it later, use the system, get the success first.

Robert Riopel:

And then once you have the success, if you still want to reinvent the

Robert Riopel:

wheel, go ahead and reinvent it because at least you have the success.

Robert Riopel:

And instead of trying to reinvent it first and in struggle all the way through.

Robert Riopel:

So that's an example of, a clue and a big one of that.

Robert Riopel:

My wife and I in the last year of being Domino's pizza franchisees, one of our

Robert Riopel:

specialties is we are traveling around Canada and into parts of the United

Robert Riopel:

States where we'd go into stores that were bankrupt or about to go bankrupt.

Robert Riopel:

Within three months, we'd retrain the staff.

Robert Riopel:

We were walking out the door and the store sales and profits were

Robert Riopel:

going up by over a hundred percent.

Robert Riopel:

And people were like, how are you guys doing that?

Robert Riopel:

They thought we were.

Robert Riopel:

And really all we are doing is going in getting rid of all the crap.

Robert Riopel:

That was not the Domino's pizza system, because the new franchisee or the

Robert Riopel:

manager wanted to do it their way.

Robert Riopel:

So they started adding a bunch of.

Robert Riopel:

And wondering why they, your sales in that went down.

Robert Riopel:

So we'd go in and get rid of all the stuff that wasn't the system, bring

Robert Riopel:

the store back and train everybody on the actual system of Domino's pizza.

Robert Riopel:

And all of a sudden sales profits magically would go up

Robert Riopel:

and we looked like rock stars.

Robert Riopel:

So that's how powerful following systems are, especially in

Robert Riopel:

business, especially in business.

Sarah St John:

Wow.

Sarah St John:

Yeah, that's a good point.

Sarah St John:

I think so many people like the whole reinventing the wheel, they might have

Sarah St John:

a good idea of how to change something, but if they don't have any success yet

Sarah St John:

or money or whatever, it's going to be really difficult to, reinvent the wheel.

Sarah St John:

Instead of.

Sarah St John:

working on the wheel that maybe already exists.

Sarah St John:

And then once you build up either experience or money or whatever, then

Sarah St John:

maybe you can think about reinventing.

Robert Riopel:

Well, yeah.

Robert Riopel:

and cause one of the traps a lot of entrepreneurs fall into is they

Robert Riopel:

think they're an entrepreneur, but they've just bought themselves a job.

Robert Riopel:

Because they got tired of their old boss and they, then they hate

Robert Riopel:

the new boss, which is themselves.

Robert Riopel:

And because he gets so caught up working in that business, they

Robert Riopel:

forget to work on it, you know?

Robert Riopel:

And I love a book I'm restudying again right now is E-Myth by Michael Gerber.

Robert Riopel:

Because when you learn about actually work on your business, even take a little bit

Robert Riopel:

of time and start to systemize everything.

Robert Riopel:

If you do that, then that's how you're going to be able to, and

Robert Riopel:

you can do it on that shoestring.

Robert Riopel:

Look at when we bought our Domino's pizzas, it took every penny we

Robert Riopel:

had just to keep them running.

Robert Riopel:

There was a lot of nights.

Robert Riopel:

We actually slept at the store underneath our ovens on hot bags,

Robert Riopel:

because we didn't have enough fuel to go home and back, I remember the one

Robert Riopel:

time Domino's pizza changed their look and we had a certain amount of time

Robert Riopel:

to update the looks of our stores.

Robert Riopel:

And while a lot of the other franchisees were hiring contractors, We're

Robert Riopel:

like, we can't afford to do that.

Robert Riopel:

So we'd work to midnight or one o'clock in the morning, shut the store down, pull

Robert Riopel:

out the ladders and we'd work on the store painting and changing and constructing

Robert Riopel:

till eight or nine in the morning, we would then get a couple of hours sleep

Robert Riopel:

and start all again at three o'clock in the afternoon and do it all over again,

Robert Riopel:

day after day after day, because we just didn't have the money to try and up.

Robert Riopel:

And to do what they wanted us to do, and they weren't going to accept

Robert Riopel:

excuses that we couldn't afford it.

Robert Riopel:

We had to figure it out.

Robert Riopel:

Right.

Robert Riopel:

And so a lot of I've noticed entrepreneurs nowadays, they get so caught up in trying

Robert Riopel:

to that they have to do it their way or another way that if they just find a

Robert Riopel:

simple system model, it work, step-by-step work on really systemizing the business

Robert Riopel:

so it can work without them so they can remove themselves from the equation.

Robert Riopel:

And what's really kind of cool is if you do this, it opens up a lot of options.

Robert Riopel:

And what I mean by that is if you can systemize your business and

Robert Riopel:

you can make it profitable by being systemized, you can now either turn

Robert Riopel:

it into your own passive income where you can be there when you want to.

Robert Riopel:

And not because it's still making a profit without you, and you can do

Robert Riopel:

another business and redo it again.

Robert Riopel:

Or there's companies out there that are actually looking for profitable systemized

Robert Riopel:

businesses, and they're willing to pay millions and billions of dollars for them.

Robert Riopel:

And a truth I love to teach entrepreneurs is if you start your business with

Robert Riopel:

the intention, I'm going to sell it.

Robert Riopel:

You're going to start systemizing it right away.

Robert Riopel:

that is the key.

Robert Riopel:

And every business I start today, or I take over my intention is I'm buying or

Robert Riopel:

starting this business with the intention of selling it because you can make

Robert Riopel:

good money owning and operating of it.

Robert Riopel:

But you can actually make more money selling your business.

Robert Riopel:

And once you've learned how to do it once rinse and repeat for those that have hair,

Robert Riopel:

I don't have to worry about that part.

Sarah St John:

I'm curious to hear more about that process of selling a business.

Sarah St John:

Can you give us some examples of, times that you've sold a business and.

Sarah St John:

Things to think about or even look out for, or how do you know

Sarah St John:

when it's the right time or the right deal, I guess, to sell it?

Robert Riopel:

Yeah.

Robert Riopel:

And I'll use the example of the two last two stores we sold the

Robert Riopel:

first one we sold under duress.

Robert Riopel:

We are stressed out beyond belief.

Robert Riopel:

We're deep in debt.

Robert Riopel:

And we felt we had to sell the business and of the two stores that we had at

Robert Riopel:

the time we wanted to sell one store that was in British Columbia, because

Robert Riopel:

it was not as profitable as our store in Alberta, but the problem was.

Robert Riopel:

Where our store was in Alberta.

Robert Riopel:

The only way you could expand in that area is why it was by buying existing stores.

Robert Riopel:

So people wanted that store.

Robert Riopel:

The other store that was in British Columbia, if you bought

Robert Riopel:

it, there was really nowhere to expand for you afterwards.

Robert Riopel:

So you're kind of limited to that store.

Robert Riopel:

So no one wanted this store.

Robert Riopel:

And so that even though we didn't want to sell the profitable store,

Robert Riopel:

we felt we had to, we are not positioned our mindset of stress.

Robert Riopel:

And if you ever noticed that when someone's desperate,

Robert Riopel:

other people can say, Right.

Robert Riopel:

And so all of a sudden this gentleman, he's like, okay, I'll buy the store.

Robert Riopel:

And he knew we were desperate.

Robert Riopel:

And originally I used to say he took advantage of us, but now I,

Robert Riopel:

again, I own it that I allowed him to take advantage of us because all

Robert Riopel:

of a sudden the price would go down.

Robert Riopel:

There would be a delay in the possession date.

Robert Riopel:

He wants to refinance all of a sudden it came down to where we actually

Robert Riopel:

finance the whole purchase, where he was paying us monthly payments instead of a

Robert Riopel:

lump sum, which didn't help us at all.

Robert Riopel:

But that was the only way we felt we could do it.

Robert Riopel:

So the mindset was really stressed out.

Robert Riopel:

I do not recommend selling a business when you're in that kind of position.

Robert Riopel:that, that was in January of:Robert Riopel:

We sold that to.

Robert Riopel:

The second store.

Robert Riopel:

All of a sudden, we now were introduced to the personal

Robert Riopel:

development and our mindset changed.

Robert Riopel:

And the first thing we realized was one of the reasons we were struggling

Robert Riopel:

is we had not systemized our stores.

Robert Riopel:

We had management in place, but if we weren't there, they didn't run it

Robert Riopel:

properly because we didn't systemize.

Robert Riopel:

And so when we can start learning these things, we went into the

Robert Riopel:

store with a whole new attitude and our attitude was this store.

Robert Riopel:

If we keep.

Robert Riopel:

Not a problem because we're going to put it up for sale.

Robert Riopel:

And if someone wants it, they want it and they'll pay our price.

Robert Riopel:

They'll, you'll be a totally different energy if they don't we'll keep it

Robert Riopel:

because as we systemized it, it was now running profitably without us.

Robert Riopel:

And so first thing you want to do is you don't want to make a buying decision or a

Robert Riopel:

selling decision out of duress and need.

Robert Riopel:

So don't even consider it unless you've systemize your business.

Robert Riopel:

Because as we did that also now the store's running smoothly.

Robert Riopel:

My wife and I aren't in it anymore.

Robert Riopel:

And out of nowhere, it's amazing how three people wanted our store out of the,

Robert Riopel:

and this is just a year later where no one wanted it a year before now, three

Robert Riopel:

people did and here was a difference.

Robert Riopel:

Our mindset created, we went to the first person and we said,

Robert Riopel:

look, you came to us first.

Robert Riopel:

So we're going to deal with you.

Robert Riopel:

We'll tell you the good, we'll tell you the bad.

Robert Riopel:

We'll tell you the.

Robert Riopel:

See, I am.

Robert Riopel:

I'm very big on being very upfront.

Robert Riopel:

I'm not going to try and hide things.

Robert Riopel:

And I'd watched a lot of stores and Domino's pizza get sold where

Robert Riopel:

the franchisee didn't tell the new franchisee something that was underlying.

Robert Riopel:

Right.

Robert Riopel:

So I said, I'm going to tell you everything.

Robert Riopel:

Here's the price.

Robert Riopel:

Non-negotiable, here's the possession date.

Robert Riopel:

Non-negotiable.

Robert Riopel:

And as long as you meet up with your end of the deal, everything

Robert Riopel:

will go through the moment.

Robert Riopel:

You don't no hard feelings.

Robert Riopel:

But our deal's done.

Robert Riopel:

I'm going to go to the next person in line.

Robert Riopel:

Are you agreeable with that?

Robert Riopel:

And the guy's like, yep, absolutely.

Robert Riopel:

I'm on board.

Robert Riopel:

Thank you so much.

Robert Riopel:

And everything was going smooth until he was supposed to put down

Robert Riopel:

a nonrefundable deposit of $5,000.

Robert Riopel:

And my wife and I are waiting for them at a coffee shop.

Robert Riopel:

He doesn't show up and we're like, what's going on?

Robert Riopel:

We form Eric.

Robert Riopel:

What's happening.

Robert Riopel:

Now in this moment, and this is the big problem, that business owner.

Robert Riopel:

If we wavered, that was on us.

Robert Riopel:

And so we said to him, we said, look, have we been clear with you?

Robert Riopel:

Yes.

Robert Riopel:

Have we told you everything?

Robert Riopel:

Yes.

Robert Riopel:

While you're not here, the deal's done.

Robert Riopel:

And we hung up the phone and my wife and I are like, we've worked

Robert Riopel:

on this for the last few months, but we had to hold to our word.

Robert Riopel:

See that energy is more important.

Robert Riopel:

Then knowing when to sell or not to sell in my opinion, within two minutes,

Robert Riopel:

he's falling back saying, oh, okay.

Robert Riopel:

I'm so sorry.

Robert Riopel:

I'm on my way now.

Robert Riopel:

And again, we could have gone.

Robert Riopel:

Okay, great.

Robert Riopel:

Let's continue.

Robert Riopel:

But see, we had told them the deal was off and I don't know where it

Robert Riopel:

came from, but my wife goes, tell him the prices went up five grand.

Robert Riopel:

I'm like, I can't.

Robert Riopel:

She says, tell him.

Robert Riopel:

So I'm like, okay, Eric, here's the deal.

Robert Riopel:

The prices went up 500.

Robert Riopel:

If you want to continue the deal and you have two hours to

Robert Riopel:

decide click, I have a phone.

Robert Riopel:

I'm like why?

Robert Riopel:

And she's like, I don't know.

Robert Riopel:

I just had to do it right.

Robert Riopel:

Cause we have to own our power.

Robert Riopel:

This was new to us.

Robert Riopel:

He phoned back within a couple minutes.

Robert Riopel:

He's like, I agree to the new terms.

Robert Riopel:

I'm on my way down with a deposit check and he met us and the rest

Robert Riopel:

of it went seamlessly smooth And to me, the difference was not about

Robert Riopel:

the deal and knowing when to do.

Robert Riopel:

It was who were we?

Robert Riopel:

Who were we as the ones putting the deal forward and in small

Robert Riopel:

businesses, that's the big problem.

Robert Riopel:

See, there's tons of buyers out there waiting because what people don't

Robert Riopel:

realize it's larger corporations.

Robert Riopel:

Why do you think Facebook and Google pay billions of dollars for other companies?

Robert Riopel:

They need it as part of their tax.

Robert Riopel:

Write-offs they're going to spend that money on taxes anyway.

Robert Riopel:

So they might as well acquire another business, another arm

Robert Riopel:

that's going to make them more.

Robert Riopel:

C.

Robert Riopel:

And that's what there's companies that are looking for other systemized

Robert Riopel:

companies in alignment with them.

Robert Riopel:

And that's why they're willing.

Robert Riopel:

If you can sit there and show that my business is making X number

Robert Riopel:

of dollars, they'll pay the 10 times, 20 times, whatever price.

Robert Riopel:

Because they're not looking for it as a big moneymaker, they just need to add

Robert Riopel:

it and get a little profit out of it and as long as it makes sense on their end,

Robert Riopel:

they're going to spend the money because it saves them in taxes, gives them more

Robert Riopel:

options and grows their business for their investors to be more valuable.

Robert Riopel:

So it becomes a win-win situation.

Sarah St John:

Yeah, that makes sense.

Sarah St John:

I hadn't really thought about that before, but, I imagine there's some people out

Sarah St John:

there who create businesses with that goal or intention mind is to sell it.

Sarah St John:

And maybe they have a particular buyer in mind even, but yeah.

Sarah St John:

So are you familiar with clubhouse?

Robert Riopel:

Absolutely.

Sarah St John:

Okay.

Sarah St John:

Yeah.

Sarah St John:

I think that.

Sarah St John:

If I'm correct.

Sarah St John:

I think Facebook offered to buy them and they said, no, but now

Sarah St John:

Facebook and Twitter and Spotify and all these other places are

Sarah St John:

coming out with something similar.

Sarah St John:

So it's like, part of me is thinking, Ooh, they probably should

Sarah St John:

have sold it before people started doing knockoffs but I don't know.

Robert Riopel:

Well, and that is, and she, and that's where

Robert Riopel:

overthinking can really overthinking and greediness can get in the way.

Robert Riopel:

You're absolutely right.

Robert Riopel:

Because if you take a look at it before Facebook live, do you even remember the

Robert Riopel:

name of the app that was out, that people were using to do live streaming, like

Robert Riopel:

Facebook live and there was a hole in the name will come to me when I quit thinking.

Robert Riopel:

And all of a sudden Facebook went, oh, that seems to be working.

Robert Riopel:

And you're getting lots of followers.

Robert Riopel:

we'll do our own version.

Robert Riopel:

And Facebook live quickly, collapsed them because they didn't keep up with it.

Robert Riopel:

But also the opposite is true is, and you take a look at the history of

Robert Riopel:

Netflix, They actually, when they started up, they went to blockbuster video.

Robert Riopel:

And they said to blockbuster, here's what we're doing.

Robert Riopel:

And we are in alignment with you.

Robert Riopel:

We're just looking for a buyout of a million dollars and blockbuster looked at

Robert Riopel:

him and said, no, that's not the future.

Robert Riopel:

Forget it.

Robert Riopel:

A few years later, blockbuster goes bankrupt and where's Netflix today.

Robert Riopel:

Right?

Robert Riopel:

So if you try to overthink about it though, Sarah is you're going to

Robert Riopel:

stress it comes down to trusting you.

Robert Riopel:

Who are you as the person?

Robert Riopel:

I'm writing my new book called the authority.

Robert Riopel:

And in the authority key, there's easy ways to teach people.

Robert Riopel:

You'll be a podcast host that elevates you as an authority, write a book,

Robert Riopel:

that'll help you become an authority.

Robert Riopel:

There's all the practical skills, but what most people don't learn and

Robert Riopel:

what I'm really diving into is who are you as the person to be able to

Robert Riopel:

not only become the authority, but have the confidence to maintain that.

Robert Riopel:

And the success that comes with.

Robert Riopel:

So you've got to be someone that can handle that.

Robert Riopel:

Otherwise you'll self-sabotage or you'll implode, or you'll make

Robert Riopel:

the wrong decisions and sell at the wrong time or not sell it all.

Robert Riopel:

See?

Robert Riopel:

So it skills are one thing, but if you work on you, who you are, that's going

Robert Riopel:

to make all the difference in the world.

Robert Riopel:

Most people think themselves out of success.

Robert Riopel:

And so it's constantly, and that's why even today I will

Robert Riopel:

never quit working on me.

Robert Riopel:

I will never quit growing who I am.

Robert Riopel:

Because the moment I think I know at all, I'm done, I'm done.

Robert Riopel:

So I'm always going to continue to be a student.

Robert Riopel:

And so as a business owner, don't think you have to know everything.

Robert Riopel:

Don't think you have to know that I got to know the right time to

Robert Riopel:

sell or what if I make a mistake, you're going to make mistakes, be

Robert Riopel:

okay with that plain and simple.

Robert Riopel:

And just trust yourself that you can handle what comes

Robert Riopel:

along if, and when it does.

Sarah St John:

Yeah.

Sarah St John:

I was going to ask about your new book.

Sarah St John:

So one of the things in the new book that you talk about are the four

Sarah St John:

phases of life and the four currencies.

Sarah St John:

I'd love to hear more about that.

Sarah St John:

That's kind of intriguing,

Robert Riopel:

let's start with the four phases then the four phases of life.

Robert Riopel:

And I love acronyms because, I tried this accent earlier.

Robert Riopel:

It didn't work, especially with the person in Texas.

Robert Riopel:

He said, here's a Canadian try and an Alabama accent, but my fours gone.

Robert Riopel:

I'm not a smart man.

Robert Riopel:

So I like acronyms.

Robert Riopel:

Cause I like to keep it simple.

Robert Riopel:

And I use the acronym of open for the forfeit.

Robert Riopel:

And when, what people want, I want them to understand is we're going

Robert Riopel:

through these phases all the time.

Robert Riopel:

You have no control when you enter or exit or how long you're in each phase.

Robert Riopel:

But if you understand the phase, you can utilize the phase and

Robert Riopel:

you can flow through life.

Robert Riopel:

And it was based on information that a friend of mine.

Robert Riopel:

I gave him a nickname years ago.

Robert Riopel:

I call them the quantum monk because not only was he actually a monk

Robert Riopel:

for eight years and did over 15,000 hours of meditation, he also loves

Robert Riopel:

to study quantum physics so he can tell you all about spirituality

Robert Riopel:

and then the science behind it.

Robert Riopel:

The man is brilliant.

Robert Riopel:

the O stands for the observation.

Robert Riopel:

When you're in the observation phase, this is where you're thinking

Robert Riopel:

about who would I like to be?

Robert Riopel:

What would I like to accomplish?

Robert Riopel:

What would I like my business to look like?

Robert Riopel:

So this is the time you meditate.

Robert Riopel:

This is the time you have vision boards, dream boards.

Robert Riopel:

It's not about how will I make it happen with all the steps is just dreaming.

Robert Riopel:

What would I love to have my life be like?

Robert Riopel:

And then from there you go into, what's called the pamper phase.

Robert Riopel:

The P stands for pamper, and this is the phase that most entrepreneurs ignore.

Robert Riopel:

Or don't think they can do.

Robert Riopel:

See, there's a big saying that says, you cannot give what you don't have.

Robert Riopel:

And most entrepreneurs are, they work, work, work, work, work, and

Robert Riopel:

they forget to take care of themselves and they wonder why they burn out.

Robert Riopel:

And I know you can't relate to that.

Robert Riopel:

What's so ever, right, Sarah, I get it.

Robert Riopel:

I thought I'd get a smile on that one.

Robert Riopel:

And so in the pamper phase, when you enter this phase, this is the

Robert Riopel:

time you book or go on a vacation.

Robert Riopel:

Get a massage, get a manicure, pedicure, maybe take 20 minutes to read a book.

Robert Riopel:

If you enjoy reading.

Robert Riopel:

I'll take my phone and I love the app calm.

Robert Riopel:

I love the sound of rain.

Robert Riopel:

So even just before this interview, I took 25 minutes.

Robert Riopel:

I just put my earbuds in, laid back and listened to rain for 25 minutes to calm,

Robert Riopel:

quiet my mind and just rejuvenate my.

Robert Riopel:

See, when you don't take care of yourself, that's when you burn out.

Robert Riopel:

That's when you get overwhelmed, that's when you start, you can't

Robert Riopel:

come in at a hundred percent focus.

Robert Riopel:

So it takes you 2, 3, 4 times longer to do things.

Robert Riopel:

And that's what I see with most entrepreneurs.

Robert Riopel:

They think they have to push through it, push hard and they

Robert Riopel:

forget to take them themselves.

Robert Riopel:

And one things I do, it's so important.

Robert Riopel:

You've heard the saying in money, wealth rule, number one, pay yourself first.

Robert Riopel:

And so here's the question.

Robert Riopel:

If that's important for money, why wouldn't you do

Robert Riopel:

the same thing for your time?

Robert Riopel:

Why wouldn't you pay yourself first for your time?

Robert Riopel:

So when my wife and I sit down and do our calendar, because we live on our

Robert Riopel:

calendars and the first thing we put on those calendars before anything

Robert Riopel:

else is we put in our balanced.

Robert Riopel:

Time together time for ourselves family health, whatever it is that allows us

Robert Riopel:

to rejuvenate that goes on our calendar first, not at the end, if there's time

Robert Riopel:

left over, we put that on there first.

Robert Riopel:

And so the pamper phase allows you to then fully utilize the third phase,

Robert Riopel:

which is called the energy phase.

Robert Riopel:

This is the, get it done phase like today.

Robert Riopel:

As an example, today is a full on energy phase.

Robert Riopel:

my first interview started at 5:00 AM my time this morning, and I won't finish up.

Robert Riopel:

I've got some power mentoring calls with students in the Philippines

Robert Riopel:

right after our interview.

Robert Riopel:

And I won't finish it until about eight 30 my time tonight.

Robert Riopel:

So including having to be ready in time up and wind down time, I'm

Robert Riopel:

putting in a 17 plus hour day today.

Robert Riopel:

Now, am I going to be tired at the end?

Robert Riopel:

Yes.

Robert Riopel:

But am I going to be burnt out and wasted?

Robert Riopel:

No.

Robert Riopel:

Because I have the pampering phase and I make sure I take care of myself.

Robert Riopel:

And when it comes to the energy phase, a lot of entrepreneurs, their excuse or what

Robert Riopel:

they come up with is, but I'm so busy.

Robert Riopel:

I don't have time to do extra stuff.

Robert Riopel:

I've got my business, I've got a family and I'm just busy and what I've realized,

Robert Riopel:

and I've noticed that, that people are really, really good at being busy, but

Robert Riopel:

they're not necessarily productive.

Robert Riopel:

And again, that's a world of difference right there.

Robert Riopel:

So the second thing I put on my phone after I put the balance pieces

Robert Riopel:

in for pampering, I put in focus.

Robert Riopel:

Because one hour, let's take into example writing my new book.

Robert Riopel:

I can sit there and go, okay, I'm going to go right on.

Robert Riopel:

Right.

Robert Riopel:

My buck I'll come into my office eight hours later I'll I can leave

Robert Riopel:

and I could go, oh my goodness.

Robert Riopel:

Was I busy?

Robert Riopel:

But it doesn't seem like I got a lot done on my book.

Robert Riopel:

What was I doing?

Robert Riopel:

And I look, oh, I was on social media.

Robert Riopel:

I was messaging.

Robert Riopel:

I was reading emails and responding.

Robert Riopel:

And I wrote a little bit of the book because I was.

Robert Riopel:

But on my calendar, I might say 10 to 11 focused on writing book.

Robert Riopel:

And when I come into the office and I write for that hour of focus

Robert Riopel:

time, I can get more done in an hour, then six hours of being busy.

Robert Riopel:

So for an entrepreneur, you can actually free up time as you get in

Robert Riopel:

the habit of having focus instead of just being busy and it takes

Robert Riopel:

discipline, it takes cause it's habit.

Robert Riopel:

We're all creatures of.

Robert Riopel:

So you've got to learn that.

Robert Riopel:

And then the fourth phase, I call it the unclutter phase.

Robert Riopel:

I know that does not start with an N and is the second letter of that word.

Robert Riopel:

But I, it was the only way I could figure out to get open, to work with

Robert Riopel:

a word that described what I wanted.

Robert Riopel:

And so I hope everybody can work with me on that.

Robert Riopel:

And the unclutter phase, another name for that is chaos.

Robert Riopel:

Have you ever noticed Sarah, that things can be going well and all of a sudden

Robert Riopel:

it's like life slaps you upside down.

Robert Riopel:

And you get into a chaotic situation.

Robert Riopel:

Heck the world's in a chaotic situation right now.

Robert Riopel:

And most people that are struggling right now in this time is

Robert Riopel:

because they're resisting chaos.

Robert Riopel:

When if you understand chaos is natural,

Robert Riopel:

but if you learn to embrace it, the reason I call it, the unclutter

Robert Riopel:

phase is because you can actually volunteer for chaos, meaning in the

Robert Riopel:

chaos or unclutter phase, you want to destroy something that's not working.

Robert Riopel:

This is the time to destroy.

Robert Riopel:

So maybe a business or personal relationship isn't working, or maybe

Robert Riopel:

you've got your desk is covered with stuff, paperwork that you

Robert Riopel:

haven't used in should be thrown away, but you keep it on your desk.

Robert Riopel:

So you can actually volunteer by I'll come into my office every couple

Robert Riopel:

of weeks and I'll unclutter my.

Robert Riopel:

Going into your closet, getting rid of the clothes that you haven't worn in

Robert Riopel:

years, but you're hoping they'll come back eventually into, style someday.

Robert Riopel:

So they're still sitting in your closet, right?

Robert Riopel:

And so by volunteering and going in and uncluttering, you can actually

Robert Riopel:

make room for the new things.

Robert Riopel:

one of the things my friend says that I love, he says, instead of

Robert Riopel:

being willing to let live life courageously allow life to live.

Robert Riopel:

And I hope people get what I just said there.

Robert Riopel:

You see, if you think as an entrepreneur, you have control over your life.

Robert Riopel:

Sorry.

Robert Riopel:

That's a huge cosmic joke right there.

Robert Riopel:

Right?

Robert Riopel:

you, only thing you have control over is how you respond to what's coming

Robert Riopel:

into your life, your reaction to it.

Robert Riopel:

And so if you're willing to courageously allow life to live.

Robert Riopel:

And you embrace chaos by volunteering by, and that's why I will

Robert Riopel:

always be, clearing my desk off.

Robert Riopel:

I'll go to the refrigerator every so often and clean out the food that

Robert Riopel:

just shouldn't be in there anymore.

Robert Riopel:

I'll clean out the closet.

Robert Riopel:

You have to be willing to let go of.

Robert Riopel:

What's good to get.

Robert Riopel:

What's great.

Robert Riopel:

Be willing to let go of.

Robert Riopel:

What's great to get.

Robert Riopel:

What's amazing.

Robert Riopel:

And so when you go through the unclutter phase, it puts you back

Robert Riopel:

up into the observation phase, which will allow you to dream even.

Robert Riopel:

And set your sights higher for more great things.

Robert Riopel:

And those go round and round and round.

Robert Riopel:

And that's how the phases work.

Sarah St John:

Oh, that's interesting.

Sarah St John:

So it's like a cycle.

Sarah St John:

You go through the phases and then.

Sarah St John:

Go back through them again.

Robert Riopel:

Yeah.

Robert Riopel:

And you were saying your personal relationship might be one

Robert Riopel:

phase, but your business can be in a totally different one.

Robert Riopel:

And so that's why you want to be able to understand how to

Robert Riopel:

identify being in a phase and then what to do while you're in there.

Robert Riopel:

So you can actually embrace.

Robert Riopel:

again, I want to put the folks on the pamper face for people.

Robert Riopel:

Entrepreneurs just don't know how to do that, or they don't

Robert Riopel:

give themselves permission.

Robert Riopel:

And you, you have to be actually creative for one and a little bit selfish on this

Robert Riopel:

phase, you know, as an example of that.

Robert Riopel:

before, COVID, when I was flying all over the world.

Robert Riopel:

On average, I was flying 200,000 miles a year and people say,

Robert Riopel:

why are you willing to get on a plane for 10, 12, 14, 16 hours?

Robert Riopel:

And one of the reasons is I love teaching people all over the world.

Robert Riopel:

Love it.

Robert Riopel:

But another reason selfish, you see Sarah, the moment I sit in the

Robert Riopel:

seat in the plane, that's my time.

Robert Riopel:

I don't do business.

Robert Riopel:

I don't connect to wifi.

Robert Riopel:

If the plane has it, I sit down and I read, cause I love to read.

Robert Riopel:

I watch movies because I love movies.

Robert Riopel:

I get a little sleep, eat some good food and drink some great wine.

Robert Riopel:

That's what I do for those long trips.

Robert Riopel:

Why?

Robert Riopel:

Because I know the moment I land in the new country for the next three to

Robert Riopel:

five days, I'm on stage for up to 12 hours a day, giving, giving, giving.

Robert Riopel:

So if I don't take care of me, how can I give to my fullest?

Sarah St John:

Yeah, that's a good point.

Sarah St John:

Cause you know, most business owners are when they're on a plane, they're working.

Sarah St John:

So to view it as kind of an opportunity to slow down and pamper yourself

Sarah St John:

like you're talking about read, watch movies and catch up on things that

Sarah St John:

you can't really do when you're, working on your business and stuff.

Sarah St John:

So.

Robert Riopel:

Right.

Robert Riopel:

and in the beginning, I, you know, whatever flight was available,

Robert Riopel:

I would take, and I'd cram into cattle, I mean, into economy.

Robert Riopel:

But at a point I made the decision that with how much flying I

Robert Riopel:

was doing, I choose not to fly anything but business concept for.

Robert Riopel:

And yes, it's more expensive, but I'm at the point where, when

Robert Riopel:

you're flying 200,000 miles a year.

Robert Riopel:

economy class just isn't for me.

Robert Riopel:

And so that's one of the ways I take care of myself and that's very, very important.

Robert Riopel:

And even it doesn't matter what stage of business ownership

Robert Riopel:

you're in, whether you're just starting where you're doing okay.

Robert Riopel:

Or whether you're amazing.

Robert Riopel:

You've got to be willing to identify who you are in that business.

Robert Riopel:

And are you the one having to make it work or you're the one that

Robert Riopel:

oversees it and it's working for you because again, it comes back to that.

Robert Riopel:

You're not really a business owner.

Robert Riopel:

You're just a solo preneur, not an entrepreneur.

Sarah St John:

Yeah.

Sarah St John:

And can you go into the, the four currencies?

Robert Riopel:

Yeah, the four currencies.

Robert Riopel:

The first one is what everybody thinks of.

Robert Riopel:

When you hear currency is the currency.

Robert Riopel:

And what I've researched and found out is that if you have too much

Robert Riopel:

money, that's called affluenza.

Robert Riopel:

And when you have affluenza, you do stupid things with your money.

Robert Riopel:

Too little money is called poverty, and everybody has a zone and your zone

Robert Riopel:

is going to be different than the next person and your zones will adjust.

Robert Riopel:

And so, as an example, when I was in my Domino's pizza, if between my

Robert Riopel:

wife and I, we were making less than 40,000 a year, we felt the financials.

Robert Riopel:

That was our kind of poverty level, because now we don't

Robert Riopel:

have enough to pay the bills.

Robert Riopel:

what are we going to do?

Robert Riopel:

Stress, stress, stress, stress, stress.

Robert Riopel:

Our affluenza level was about a hundred thousand a year.

Robert Riopel:

Anytime we'd get over that, we'd start making investments without

Robert Riopel:

properly doing the due diligence.

Robert Riopel:

And then we'd be surprised when we'd lose money.

Robert Riopel:

It would just be like, I don't have time.

Robert Riopel:

Sounds good.

Robert Riopel:

Here's the money.

Robert Riopel:

And so we're making bad mistakes.

Robert Riopel:

as long as we're in the zone, we're good.

Robert Riopel:

Outside of the zone is where I life was different.

Robert Riopel:

So what I've seen.

Robert Riopel:

Like today because I like my lifestyle.

Robert Riopel:

My current poverty level is about 200,000 a year.

Robert Riopel:

If I'm making less than that, I get stressed.

Robert Riopel:

And my affluenza level is now about a million a year.

Robert Riopel:

If I'm making more than a million a year, all of a sudden I start noticing I started

Robert Riopel:

doing odd things with the money and not properly paying attention and doing

Robert Riopel:

my investment, doing my due diligence.

Robert Riopel:

So your, levels will always adjust with who you are as a person.

Robert Riopel:

And everybody's.

Robert Riopel:

So that's the first currency.

Robert Riopel:

The second currency is the one currency that we all have the exact same

Robert Riopel:

amount of, and that's the currency of.

Robert Riopel:

Too much time on your hand.

Robert Riopel:

You're bored too little time, your stress.

Robert Riopel:

And it amazed me when we entered into the COVID generation.

Robert Riopel:

How many people, when they're at home, they're going on board.

Robert Riopel:

I got nothing to do and I'm like, come on over to my place.

Robert Riopel:

I'll give you lots to do I went from flying 200,000 miles a year

Robert Riopel:

to zero and I became busier at home because I was in re-invention.

Robert Riopel:

Right.

Robert Riopel:

So when you're looking at the currency at time is again, are you being

Robert Riopel:

busy or are you being productive?

Robert Riopel:

You've got to really watch on that currency of time.

Robert Riopel:

And that's why, again, taking care of yourself and having scheduling your

Robert Riopel:

things first is important because it doesn't matter how much money you have.

Robert Riopel:

You're not going to be able to buy them.

Robert Riopel:

No matter what.

Robert Riopel:

So work, work, work, work, work, and hoping to have a great life that maybe

Robert Riopel:

when you finally get successful, you have your health and have time and, and

Robert Riopel:

family laugh because you haven't, you know, worked yourself out of family.

Robert Riopel:

That's why you've got to start thinking of it now, especially in the time.

Robert Riopel:

Third currency is a currency of fame and what's interesting is fame.

Robert Riopel:

you've seen fame ruined.

Robert Riopel:

You see it in the media all the time.

Robert Riopel:

And so, especially when you become a successful entrepreneur

Robert Riopel:

that comes with a level of fame, because now you've got success.

Robert Riopel:

People are starting to know you more.

Robert Riopel:

And the question isn't, how do I become famous is how do I maintain that level?

Robert Riopel:

And the difference between us and I'll use Hollywood as an example, the actors

Robert Riopel:

and actresses that seem to crumble when they get famous versus the ones

Robert Riopel:

that seem to be around for decades.

Robert Riopel:

What's the deal.

Robert Riopel:

Well, it's who they are and how they view that fame.

Robert Riopel:

And I love an interview that I saw years ago, where Jennifer Lopez was

Robert Riopel:

being interviewed and the person said, you know, J-Lo, you're a powerhouse

Robert Riopel:

in business, singer dancer, actress.

Robert Riopel:

Oh my goodness.

Robert Riopel:

All these things and a business woman, but you're also a powerhouse

Robert Riopel:

in your relationships, your family, the importance of them.

Robert Riopel:

How do you keep the two.

Robert Riopel:

And she said, well, I'm just me.

Robert Riopel:

I'm Jennifer Lopez.

Robert Riopel:

But when I'm in front of the camera, when I'm doing business,

Robert Riopel:

I'm, J-Lo, that's my persona.

Robert Riopel:

When I'm at home with family, I'm Jennifer, I'm just Jennifer Lopez.

Robert Riopel:

And I went, wow.

Robert Riopel:

See, when I'm traveling around the world, Sarah and I'm in front of

Robert Riopel:

thousands of people and I've got assistants taking care of everything

Robert Riopel:

for me, I'm Robert, Raymond real pelt.

Robert Riopel:

That's my brand.

Robert Riopel:

That's who I am.

Robert Riopel:

But when I come home, I'm just Robert or Rob to my family and my

Robert Riopel:

wife and I have a running joke.

Robert Riopel:

You know, I can come home from being overseas for a couple of

Robert Riopel:

weeks and I'll come home and she'll go, honey, you're home.

Robert Riopel:

Now you have no more assistance here.

Robert Riopel:

Go take out the garbage.

Robert Riopel:

And I love it because it keeps me grounded.

Robert Riopel:

can you imagine next week as an example, we're going camping with family.

Robert Riopel:

We love to hear.

Robert Riopel:

Yeah.

Robert Riopel:

Imagine I sit around the campfire and I'm like, don't you guys know who I am.

Robert Riopel:

I'm Robert, Raymond real bell will get me a beer.

Robert Riopel:

I'm not going to go over very well with family.

Robert Riopel:

Right.

Robert Riopel:

They're going to be like, you know, you're my little brother and I'll give

Robert Riopel:

you a new, you get off your high horse.

Robert Riopel:

And so with the currency of fame, it's just about knowing that be you.

Robert Riopel:

And when things are going well, don't get into the.

Robert Riopel:

Continue being you because to me, that's the greatest gift.

Robert Riopel:

Anybody can give the planet.

Robert Riopel:

That's the third currency.

Robert Riopel:

And then the fourth currency is the one I choose to spend most of

Robert Riopel:

my energy and time on right now.

Robert Riopel:

It is a currency of experience.

Robert Riopel:

See, and this is another one, especially for entrepreneurs.

Robert Riopel:

As an example, entrepreneurs are so far in the future trying to figure out all

Robert Riopel:

the, what if scenarios, how everything should look out, where things should go.

Robert Riopel:

What if this happens?

Robert Riopel:

What if that happens?

Robert Riopel:

Or they're so tied in the path.

Robert Riopel:

Well, that didn't work.

Robert Riopel:

And if I do it again, I'm going to have the same result that they forget to be

Robert Riopel:

in the present, the here and now and experience what's going on in that moment.

Robert Riopel:

And then they wonder why also when they do hit success, they look back and they

Robert Riopel:

go, what did I do the last 10 years?

Robert Riopel:

Why is my health not good?

Robert Riopel:

Why is my family?

Robert Riopel:

Why did I end up?

Robert Riopel:

Why are my children not talking to me?

Robert Riopel:

Why did I get a divorce unsuccessful?

Robert Riopel:

But they forgot to be in the moment experiencing the day to day.

Robert Riopel:

And so that's what I really focused on.

Robert Riopel:

And I use a lot of Zen principles on that one where meditation's important and what

Robert Riopel:

people, a lot of people don't understand.

Robert Riopel:

Cause I didn't is that meditation is just simply being present.

Robert Riopel:

And at any time during the day that you're truly present with what you're

Robert Riopel:

doing, you're actually meditating.

Robert Riopel:

So one of my goals every day is to see how much I can meditate throughout the day.

Robert Riopel:

See you and I are talking right now, I'm here present with you.

Robert Riopel:

You're here present with me.

Robert Riopel:

We're aware of everything else that's going on, but we're

Robert Riopel:

here in this moment right now.

Robert Riopel:

So we're actually meditating at the same time, which is kind of cool.

Robert Riopel:

Those are the four currencies.

Sarah St John:

Oh, interesting.

Sarah St John:

Yeah.

Sarah St John:

I hadn't thought of that before as a form of meditation.

Sarah St John:

Wow.

Sarah St John:

That's interesting.

Sarah St John:

when does that book come out?

Sarah St John:

Do you have a release date yet?

Robert Riopel:

We're looking probably around the beginning

Robert Riopel:

of the year is the goal for it.

Sarah St John:

if people want to learn more about you, they

Sarah St John:

can go to Robert Rio, pell.com.

Sarah St John:

That's R I O P E L for the last name and success left a clue.com.

Sarah St John:

I'll also have show notes with links to everything at the Sarah St.

Sarah St John:

john.com forward slash.

Sarah St John:

Are are, are for your name forever Raymond rebel

Robert Riopel:

and the three RS.

Robert Riopel:

Yeah.

Robert Riopel:

And Sarah, you know, because you were so gracious to have me on as a guest on

Robert Riopel:

your podcast, as I would love to, from us to your audience, give them a gift for

Robert Riopel:

taking their valuable time to listen is if they go to the Robert real pell.com.

Robert Riopel:

They are actually going to be able to download the full

Robert Riopel:

digital version of my book.

Robert Riopel:

Success left a clue as our gift to them for taking their valuable time.

Robert Riopel:

And because time is one of our most precious commodities.

Robert Riopel:

And I will tell you, though, it does come with a caveat and the caveat is this.

Robert Riopel:

I didn't write this book for people to read it, put it on the

Robert Riopel:

shelf and make it shelf help.

Robert Riopel:

That's not why I wrote the book.

Robert Riopel:

See, because most people.

Robert Riopel:

Step number three in the book is taking action.

Robert Riopel:

So I wrote this as a workbook, meaning there's action steps all the way through.

Robert Riopel:

And so don't just read it.

Robert Riopel:

I want you to actually do the action steps because if you

Robert Riopel:

do, it will change your life.

Robert Riopel:

And here's what's going to happen is in the book.

Robert Riopel:

You'll come apart where after an action step, it'll say something.

Robert Riopel:

Did you do the last action?

Robert Riopel:

If not stop reading right now, go back, do the action.

Robert Riopel:

Then continue reading because we know people are creatures of habit

Robert Riopel:

and so I'm going to call them on it.

Robert Riopel:

And so I would love for them to go and download it and utilize

Robert Riopel:

the book and watch how it impacts.

Sarah St John:

Awesome.

Sarah St John:

I think I'm going to have to do that myself.

Sarah St John:

Well I like physical books, so I might actually just order it on

Sarah St John:

Amazon, but, and your new book when it comes out as well, so.

Sarah St John:

Awesome.

Sarah St John:

Well, I really appreciate your time today.

Robert Riopel:

Oh, my pleasure.

Robert Riopel:

I tell you what Terry semi and.

Robert Riopel:

And I'll have my team mail you out a hard copy for having me on your podcast.

Sarah St John:

Oh, well, awesome.

Sarah St John:

I appreciate it.

Robert Riopel:

Thank you.

Robert Riopel:

Yeah.

Robert Riopel:

Email me your mailing address.

Robert Riopel:

I will make sure we get it in the mail the next couple of days

Robert Riopel:

so that you can, because I love physical books myself as well.

Sarah St John:

And I've never heard her referred to a

Sarah St John:

shelf help, but that's funny.

Robert Riopel:

And that's what most people do because unfortunately, the

Robert Riopel:

statistic is only 3% of people will actually use the information that.

Robert Riopel:

Only 3% in north America.

Robert Riopel:

Yeah.

Robert Riopel:

And that's why, and they wonder why their lives don't change.

Robert Riopel:

You've got to take action.

Robert Riopel:

You really do.

Robert Riopel:

Thanks, sir.

About the author